Forests of Poland

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Polish forests cover about 30% of Poland's territory, and are mostly owned by the state. Western and northern parts of Poland as well as the Carpathian Mountains in the extreme south, are much more forested than eastern and central provinces.1 The most forested administrative districts of the country are: Lubusz Voivodeship (48,9%), Subcarpathian Voivodeship (37,2%), and Pomeranian Voivodeship (36,1%).1 The least forested are: Łódź Voivodeship (21%), Masovian Voivodeship (22,6%), and Lublin Voivodeship (22,8%). Forest in Poland occupy the poorest soil.
Coniferous type accounts for 54.5%, whereas broadleaved type accounts for 45.5% (out of that, alder and riparian forests account for 3.8%).

A number of forested zones are now protected by the Polish government and, in many cases, they have become tourist destinations.

Over the years, many of the largest Polish forests have been reduced in size, and that reflected on the structure of forest inhabitation. Up until the end of the 18th Century, beginning in what is known as the Middle Ages, forests were considered places for travelers and ordinary folk to stay away from, as they were home to bandits and were believed to be inhabited by evil spirits. Law and order did not apply to forests for many centuries, except for self-policing observed and administered by their inhabitants. However, the forests did contain numerous woodsmen and their families who made the best of their remote environment.

These woodsmen lived on what the forest could produce, collecting pitch resin for sale ? important as method of illuminating city streets ? logging construction lumber, collecting lime, bees wax, honey, hops, mushrooms and whatever other saleable items could be harvested in the forest and sold in villages outside of it.Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forests_of_Poland

Welcome in Masuria

Masuria and the Masurian Lake District are known in Polish as Kraina Tysiąca Jezior and in German as Land der Tausend Seen, meaning "land of a thousand lakes." These lakes were ground out of the land by glaciers during the Pleistocene ice age around 14,000 - 15,000 years ago, when ice covered northeastern Europe. From that period originates the horn of a reindeer found in the vicinity of Giżycko.96 By 10,000 BC this ice started to melt.

Great geological changes took place and even in the last 500 years the maps showing the lagoons and peninsulas on the Baltic Sea have greatly altered in appearance.

More than in other parts of northern Poland, such as from Pomerania (from the River Oder to the River Vistula), this continuous stretch of lakes is popular among tourists.

The terrain is rather hilly, with connecting lakes, rivers and streams. Forests account for about 30% of the area.9798 The northern part of Masuria is covered mostly by the broadleaved forest, while the southern part is dominated by pine and mixed forestsŹródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masuria#Landscape

Strictly protected nature Poland

In recent times, there has been rapid development of tourism in Poland. More and more people are convinced to leave in their home country, instead of choosing entertainment abroad.

No wonder - in Poland, we have to choose a lot of really attractive natural sites.

Definitely worth to go although a few of them to see with their own eyes that nature in Poland is truly unique.

This is evidenced not only a large number of national parks in Poland, but also a lot of nature reserves and parks in our country.

What's more, many regions have been appreciated even by the global company and included in the list of UNESCO biosphere reserves. It is a huge honor.

So let's spend a holiday in Poland..

Widok do druku:

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